Tiny House, Tiny ecoLab

One of my first big projects, outside of my Wetland Restoration Work, is working on creating and building my own mobile lab (Or as many of you know them as, A Tiny House). One that is Environmentally Sound and is stable enough to go on location to Environmentally unstable areas. I don’t want to create an ominous and scary sterile lab but one that is capable of taking the dirty hit that my field requires. A home away from home when I’m in an area that isn’t my home. That’s why when I stumbled upon the Tiny House, Big Living HGTV show, a tiny lightbulb went off in my head. They are built sturdy enough to travel and would replace the added expense of a hotel! Perfect! Plus, I get to sleep around science!!!!  Nerd Squeal—It’s a thing!!!

History Behind The Idea

The idea of my own lab didn’t happen organically. It arose after a troubling meeting with the President of my University in the Fall. My Tribal University that I attend is not without its major hurdles. It takes some serious dedication to attend there. Haskell is severely underfunded and is quite dilapidated. But despite all of this I love this University. Not for what it has the potential to be but for its historic past. That I can choose to attend here when children the age of my own kids didn’t have that option. Haskell arose from the crippling era of forced Native American Boarding Schools and turned into a place of hope for our critical cultural revival.

I was informed that even if I secured grant funding for a lab on campus there just wasn’t going to be the campus support for lab space or resources for me to access for research. It broke my heart hearing that because attending a school as unique as this opens the door to specific types of grants but if the campus couldn’t support it, I was facing the very real possibility of having to leave.

Despite my Heart Breaking into a Million pieces, I made an off the cuff comment to the President about building my own Tiny House if I needed to. She Laughed, then I laughed, then the secretary laughed. I don’t think even I truly believed it could be done. However, from there the idea took root despite not really taking it serious at the time and I began to panic because the time for my research was coming up within the next year.

The Future Of My Tiny ecoLab

My Tiny ecoLab will have a future past Academic Research. After school is completed I have the exciting Field of Environmental Consulting awaiting me.  This is where my Tiny ecoLab will serve it’s long-term purpose. It will be tackling Environmental Issues with me from sea to shining sea. I relish the idea of doing some wide-scale Environmental Cleanup work on Turtle Island. My people have been guardians of this wonderful land for thousands of years. And we loved it. I am excited that my field gives me the opportunity to continue this amazing legacy. While I will be focusing on working with Tribal Entities my work won’t end there. I love the idea of working with Tribal Entities because we are all so diverse and our Environments range from Lush Forested Regions, to the Desert, and all the way to the Prairie at the Heart of the Country.

What’s Next?

Fundraising… I will be launching a GoFundMe Project in the next two weeks. The link will be posted and a new post will be put out when that goes live. So Stay Tuned!

  • I have spent the last few months developing this site and compiling preliminary research on Tiny Houses. I know my first step will be on the acquisition of a Trailer. So that became the first major part of this journey. I have decided to go with the Tumbleweed Cypress 20 floor plan.

Love,

N.K.

About N.K.

N.K. is a Mom, Blogger, and Native American Environmental Scientist living in the State of Kansas. When she's not in the field collecting samples, she's ushering her children around the Soccer Field, or has her nose buried in a book. Her passion for the Environment and being a Mom are her greatest attributes.

Comments

  1. Sounds very cool and I’m looking in more designs of tiny houses, wondering if it might be a good solution as a workspace for me.

  2. So many different tiny house projects now. Good on you for taking on the challenge. Best always.

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